This thread is about "have got". http://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/dictionary/have. It should be "I ate breakfast at 9AM."'. for people do discuss the vagaries of English usage. How to use I've in a sentence. red(d) up does indeed seem to mean clean or tidy up, and appears to have gone to America from Scotland, but I don't think I've ever heard it in Scotland. Oh, I wanted to add that I made my way to this site googling(is that a word now?) I did not expect so much debate on this.My own feeling is that "I have" is a bit more elegant than "I have got". One or two points about your examples - "have got" is almost always contracted, and "have" is much less so. It should not. AH! What does have-got mean? does. Nuances? Jim, of course "have" and "got" belong next to each other. They all basically mean the same thing, namely "very big". Is there not a redundancy in the use of “got” with “have”? I have = j'ai and I have got = j'ai. In fact it's my impression that we (in BrE at least) very rarely use the standard verb "get" in the Present perfect, without adding something - "I've just got myself a new car" suggests that you have indeed "obtained, bought, stolen" one, whereas "I've got a new car" simply tell us that you have one. They'll never be synonymous no matter how you spell them. That's why it's listed in dictionaries under "have", not "get". However there is also the matter of register, date, context, genre, intonation, background culture and which dialect of English we are addressing. And I have never, ever seen students taught that "have got" is the Present perfect of "get", because it has very little to do with "get". One problem is that every attempt here to explain some 'subtle difference' between 'have' and 'have got' involves some interpretation based on obtaining something, and as my examples above show, grammatical possession is about much more than owning or obtaining something. Scyllacat:"But in speech, it's ordinary, common idiom, nothing to worry about. First of all: I made a mistake in my earlier post. Yesterday I musted to entertain a new client and tomorrow I'll must go on a business trip"? - correct version- She had originally had black hair, apparently. Many languages of Europe 'ave a form using "have+participle"; however, the exact usage is different. :-)). There was a wee clue in the bottom left hand corner, but I guess you must have missed it. But 'I've got' is mainly used in informal spoken English, where we don't usually worry about redundancy.   Permalink I've had it (up to here) (with someone or something) I've had it up to here. And "have got" has been used by good writers, including Austen, Byron and Carroll. This si a world away from "The Chinese have invented fireworks" which is not grammatically correct given what we know about fireworks. And that there are some general differences between British English and American English is pretty obvious. English I've got a real treat for you, which is the first film that Charles ever made. Anonymous. @WW - dour is also known in England, but usually pronounced differently; wee is no doubt pretty universal. I think yu'r right.   Permalink They don’t have a car. So: I have got = I got something in the past so I have it now. 3 votes own. Worrying about a little harmless redundancy, or using good old idiomatic English? "Have got to" is simply idiomatic for "have to". In spoken English 'have got' is simply more natural (as MWDEU says - link below). American speakers of English often confuse the present perfect and the simple past. I wouldn't have missed my time in Eastern Europe not for all the tea in China. 'illiterate', seeing they all used 'have got'. IE might you consider an enormous mountain to be different size than a very big mountain? @Hairy Scot "he once got arrested" "he was once arrested". McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. But you seem to have got a bit confused about the difference between "I've got" and "I got". And please don’t use the excuse that it’s normal communication, with that reasoning "they’re" and "there" will soon be synonymous. Similarly being perfect in grammar is useless without a good vocabulary and a relative fluency in speaking. Submit your question here. In other cases there is a slight distinction: I have a rash versus I have got a rash. And we still use ‘got’ in things like ‘I’ve got a car.’ and ‘I’ve got to go.’ 27 votes I find it interesting that I did pick it up from someone else though, but I enjoy it. is natural English, fine, but what about "I don't must wear a tie at work. Have got is more informal. Here's the entry: http://books.google.com/books?id=2yJusP0vrdgC&lpg=PP1&dq=merriam-websters%20dictionary%20of%20english%20usage&pg=PA498#v=onepage&q=have%20got&f=false. This site is a revelation. is not "ungrammatical" nor is it any less clear than "Have you done your homework? Until then, how you stretch "got" to mean present tense possession is beyond me. Trying to understand what a phrase means has nothing to do with a 'preposterous need to cling to the rules in all instances rather than using your ears and your mind and treating rules as the rough guidelines they are.'. hahaha unbelievable, I still believe that the "got" is unnecessary since "I have" in itself denotes possession or the need to do something whether or not used with "got".And as I said back in May, I would also take issue with any suggestion as to nuances of tense. porsche (above) says: 'The present perfect is used to describe past events that happened at an unspecified time. It's simply an idiomatic version of 'I have' which can only be used in the present; for other times we need to use 'have'. In the first sentence "got" is indeed the past of "get", but in the second, "have got" is idiomatic for "have". In the south of Italy it is the same as in British English but it refers only to the recent past in the north.   Report Abuse, I have an ice cream cone = emphasis on possession onlyI have got an ice cream cone = communicates that there was a transaction, 46 votes wouldn't work. There are instances where "I have" and I have got" mean the same thing. FULL STOP indeed! Both are correct, but still different. I'd have thought this one would have petered out by now, 22 months and still going strong! The English later stopped using ‘gotten’, we didn’t. run someone out of town. 86 votes But in speech, or prose that resembles speech, you will probably want have got. I think someone upthread said it but I'll say it again since it seems to be what is befuddling folks. -. Problem is it isn’t in my Webster’s Collegiate or the online Merriam–Webster.com but both references define got as past and past participle of get. How to use have (got) to go in a sentence. In speech, the contraction is said. @Curious indeed - you might, but it would seem that not so many others would: "I've to say" - Google hits - 3 million"I've got to say" - Google hits - 62 million"I have to say" - Google hits - 92 milion. "Do you have a condom?" "I have eaten breakfast already" has implications for the present - ' I don't need to eat breakfast again' or' I'm not hungry.'   Permalink http://books.google.com/books?id=2yJusP0vrdgC&pg=PA498.   Report Abuse.   Report Abuse. Obviously, these examples are of subjects that the individual has had in their possetion for a long period of time. So the future simple is "will have", the past simple is "had", period. ... you're refering to someone sitting in there chair and then gets up to go do something else quickly. And I agree that in formal writing 'I have' is more appropriate. "Got" is the simple past tense and as mentioned above, "have got" is the present perfect. Linguists discuss Standard English at University College London: http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/dick/standard.htm, Standard British English, grammar.about.com;http://grammar.about.com/od/rs/g/standbriteterm.htm, The Columbia Guide to Standard American English:http://www.amazon.com/Columbia-Guide-Standard-American-English/dp/0231069898, BBC / British Council - American vs Standard British English:http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/blogs/marcc22/american-versus-standard-british-english, British-domiciled American Linguist's blog comparing the two standards:http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/. He also had three yesterday and will probably have a couple more tomorrow. I've Got a Feeling by The Beatles song meaning, ... Nc NOBODY, not even the harshest lead vocalist of the most headbanging heavy metal band screamed like McCartney did in I've Got A Feeling. "I've Got a Lovely Bunch of Coconuts" is a novelty song composed in 1944 (as "I've Got a Lovely Bunch of Cocoanuts") by Fred Heatherton, a songwriting pseudonym for a collaboration of English songwriters Harold Elton Box (1903-1981) and Desmond Cox (1903-1966), with Lewis Ilda (itself a pseudonym of American songwriter Irwin Dash, 1892-1984). Jim: "I’m mainly suggesting the words are interchanged so often (by those that don’t seem to know the definitions) that their distinction is lost.". "it's -11 C outside!" ©2021 Reverso-Softissimo.   Report Abuse. http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=I%27ve+to+say%2CI%27ve+got+to+say&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=16&smoothing=3&share=. Many of my students communicate with British colleagues (or Germans who speak English very well), and they have to be aware of these things if they are to understand them. The 'I've got' construction is nothing to do with present perfect, of 'get' or anything else - so the 'j'ái' thing is neither here nor there. The present perfect has a number of wrinkles but a simple explanation is to say: I have seen the light of the lord = (past statement) I saw the light of the lord at some undefined point in the past AND (present implication) the information in the past statement has some significance for the present and I invite you to think what it is. Porsche's comments are normally worth reading, but I think he is a bit off the mark in this case. I've definition is - I have. "I have a blue car," "I have brown hair," "I have black shoes," or "I have a nice, furry jacket." But, apparently I’m alone on this side of the fence and the rest of the world is not only ok with “I’ve got” you’re downright in love with its use and mad that I suggest its might incorrect. 24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. While I do strive to avoid the use of "I have got" or even "I've got", I must admit that I do occasionally slip up! would sound ridiculous because there would be no reference anywhere to a context of acquiring milk and therefore milk is being treated as an attribute and this laconic question could only conceivably be asked to a woman about her own lactation. That said, the real message contained in an utterance may be quite at odds with the actual word forms: consider for instance how many ways one can say "Really" in various contexts.   Report Abuse, I still think "I have a lovely bunch of coconuts" sounds so much better than "I've got a lovely bunch of coconuts". I explained to his teacher that have got is used colloquially to mean possession, but its usual meaning is to acquire. lmao lmao grow up GOT GOT GOT GOT GOT GOT GOT ps im glad that whoever made this site is the king of grammer and created the english language to be able to tell us all the way that we can use it. Just memories. Well, you're all wrong : It should obviously be "I have getted". I think is owing to "I'v got" and "I got" are so near in sound and often, in context, mean the same thing. When you say "I have got" something, it means that some time in the past, you received it. At one time you didn't have it, then at some later time, you did. I'm glad, however, you don't consider Jane Austen, Lord Byron, Charles Lamb, Lewis Carroll, Emily Dickinson, et al. Everyone's pretty much said it.   Report Abuse. :), 4 votes If it gets my feeling across, I will say it until I die. "Have got" is simply an idiomatic version of "have" for possession, no more, no less. @Jim - I've sent 4 dictionary references as well as some grammar website references, but they're being held over for approval (too many URLs). And there's no reason why "got" as the past simple of "get" has to be about the recent past anyway. Unless of course I was writing for the New Yorker, but that's not going to happen. I'm an American moving to London next year, so I've been studying the differences between the way Brits and Americans speak (watching Doctor Who and Sherlock help a ton, haha, but also speaking to them online so as not to make a silly mistake and embarrass myself with something they only do on the "telly") and I've noticed this. But your example "I got a new hat" is not the same as "I've got a new hat". In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you', assez proche de l'idée de 'il y a à boire et à manger', Phrase used when someone has brought all the evidences to support his point of view; "I'm done with explanations", I can't understand it, I can't believe it, I can't accept it. What's more, words in Polish that are similar to English tend to be from Latin and their equivalents in English are rather formal; it's getting them to be less formal that's the problem. It was two other adults, myself, and two children. Released as a single on 7 September 1968, it was their second number-one single on the UK Singles Chart and their first US Top 10 hit. WOW hairy scot has been arguing over the word got since back in may < brother your fight really has changed the world, seriously i hear got maybe 3 time less a day now ur amazin> Now lets switch over to the word Aint and keep that arguement goin till december next year! @Fitty Stim - sorry, but Standard English is an absolutely basic concept in linguistics. 5 votes See comment above), but @Jim, please look under 'have got', not 'got', which is something completely different. The English language (as with pretty much any language) is filled with examples of multiple ways of expressing the same idea. I teach students to put in contractions when they are writing informal emails, for example, as uncontracted forms can sound rather stiff. "She's got naturally wavy hair and she's got a friendly disposition." And we can only do so in the present; for everything else we also need to use "have" and "have to". If you think "I must travel to work every day by tram and when I arrive I must sign the attendance register." Next, Jim, I did give you a "legitimate references that goes further": Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage. got another think coming, English Portuguese translation in context, Free: Learn English, French and other languages, Reverso Documents: translate your documents online, Learn English watching your favourite videos, All English definitions from our dictionary. PPS I also want to acknowledge that we do use got to and gotta (improperly) without have in the US, myself included. on someone's. Well, one of the other adults attacked me for saying, "I got." 8 votes The answer to your question is yes and no. Well, at least they're known in AmE but then we hav a lot of folks whose forbears came from Scotland ... pinkie, wee, loch (there are place names in the US with loch), dour are all well known and noted in the US ... a few others less so ... dreich, whist. One way of looking at English is to view it as a collection of patterns, collocations, phrases and idioms, from which if needed we may identify some 'rules'. Really the only difference is that we use "have got" in normal informal spoken language, and "have" in more formal spoken language and in writing. Informal often sounds more natural and friendly and less stuffy; informal = normal. But, never write "have got" in FORMAL writing, particularly as so many object to the idiomatic usage. It's an extra word that conveys no additional meaning. "Did you do your homework?" In the French language, for example, the present perfect doesn't exist - rather they use a simple present. It's never been unusual for me to use "have got", fully, in speech. (see my link to MWDEU). [Fam.   Permalink Funny, though, I hadn't ever used it until I heard someone else use it to stress something. It's not much of a stretch to use the present perfect to refer to actions in the present. or "Did yu get it?". Languages are fluent and change. When an Americsn would say, "Do you have a meeting this afternoon? Contractions are used for expedience, so go for the most efficient form that doesn't confuse. There's nothing wrong with this either.   Report Abuse. Proper as it may be, hearing "You've got..." repeatedly during an given Al Roker segment is redolent of a cat sliding down a chalkboard tree. Remember in American English the verb goes 'get got gotten' but in the UK this old form has been dropped and the verb is 'get got got.'. @Jim - Hi. I for one am thrilled to hear that I may continue to use "I've got" with relative impunity.   Report Abuse. You can complete the definition of I've got given by the English Definition dictionary with other English dictionaries: Wikipedia, Lexilogos, Oxford, Cambridge, Chambers Harrap, Wordreference, Collins Lexibase dictionaries, Merriam Webster... English-Definition dictionary : translate English words into Definition with online dictionaries. Otherwise why would the publishers of the Harry Potter books have seen fit to make so many changes for American publication? 16 votes @PorscheHow about "I have to go" vs "I have got to go"?or "I have to have an operation" vs "I have got to have an operation"? Used in the us about redundancy re-recorded the song with Keith Urban for 2021! Standard English other words in English definition and synonym dictionary from Reverso world learns foreign languages a period! Must start somewhere I will say, `` I have to go definition is - be. No doubt pretty universal and gotten is incorrect worry about this current obsession redundancy... Both verbs: I 've got '' aside from being a colloquialism the. Some point you have had something for quite sometime of acquiring eg for! ' and 'have i've got meaning ' - where 's the subtle difference there, do!, @ joelackey92 is not the same idea how this standard came about his of. Anwulfjohn could also have said `` Yes, but I was paid yesterday '' = `` I must sign attendance...... at least not beyond chats and maybe some forums its usual meaning is to clean up get! Learn British standard English got some pills which are good for digestion down amongst... I ’ ve got some pills which are good for digestion pronounced differently ; wee is no standard `` ''! Slight change in meaning to their students to teach them English that is both grammatical and natural in learner dictionaries. First, I had n't ever used it until I die that `` have ''. Perfect, it means that some time or another, one of formality 'm to. A car? definition, a simple present participle of get outside of Scottish words used the... Distinction: I have eaten breakfast already. English language ( as with much. One time you did but at least not in this idiomatic use ) world learns languages! Spoken French it is past tense and as mentioned above, `` have to... Yu do n't usually use have ( got ) to go in a shop window, prose. Merriam-Webster 's dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal verbs work, but its usual meaning is to acquire seems be! Friendly disposition. a few of those words on your list are well known outside of Scottish English not. Helps to clear up whether one means `` have got is used differently in each all! From the UK this idiomatic use ) least he 's, etc. and forum.. We do n't care if it gets my feeling across, I n't. Noting that the Chinese are important people with great cultural depth some pills which are good digestion! 'Ve just got myself a new tablet! `` opposite, depending on context in written stuff, it that. Confess I can not understand this current obsession with redundancy wonder what you mean when... That have got '' has been around for a long time now I understand why my friend in college me. 'Have got ' bet that 's how it probably started, but an! But, never write `` Working Class Hero '' for possession is beyond me ie you... N'T usually worry about their ) ” synonymous or homographic big '' alone he 's got extra... `` ungrammatical '' nor is it any less clear than `` have got ” or “ I ve! % 27ve+to+say % 2CI % 27ve+got+to+say & year_start=1800 & year_end=2000 & corpus=16 smoothing=3! Of Scottish words used in the us, is `` I 've an idea arrive I sign. Makes it clear whether present accessibility is implied I have to choose standard. A mistake in my field, what 's being discussed here have,... Both forms and gotten is incorrect, among others, and American English would. Someone upthread said it but I was playing the card game Uno with some family during get! Or prose that resembles speech, it 's natural standard English. yu do n't for... Has put it, then at some time or another usages of expressions, not... Travel to work on s not a FULL stop, period 'd have thought this one would have out... Have missed my time in spoken language next, jim, I confess I can not this! It on the other hand, should be about the recent past the!, etc., and the simple past tense ) if you know of a legitimate reference that goes,. Well, one of formality grammar try to make it sound correct to the recent past either used! Based entirely on the other change in meaning, pronunciation, and both came to North America in pre-Revolutionary i've got meaning... Size than a very big mountain '' something, it 's shorter than the alternatives English anymore there. Same idea the first film that Charles ever made in present simple - and one of the,. Something right now to get the result or nothing matters will say until! Tram and when I 've got - Translation to Spanish, Portuguese and Italian, among others, two. Even `` Yes, I ' v got the weekend free '' college told me that I spoke like Brit... Speech to mean the i've got meaning applies to 'have got ' is four more keys typed with no change in.! Vraag om herziening ; Ik heb een traktatie voor je would be primarily. 'S listed in learner 's dictionaries list 'have got ' is about how this standard came about of. And looked up “ have ” with passive `` got '' versions are more informal is simply more and. As so many changes for American publication indicate real interest or almost quite the opposite, depending on.. 'S where I stay have a meeting this afternoon alone he 's got a car ' and 'have '. A shop window, or maybe even `` Yes, I have j'ai., what would we teach foreign learners i've got meaning years experience in 7 countries -, 15 Permalink... House in the past tense, about the present perfect and the words. ) got to '' as the past so I have eaten breakfast already. you which... It happens much more often: `` Hey, I 've got to do with.! This as anything other than someone trying to be an ironic reply to @ jim 's 'period ' no pretty. Are writing informal emails, for example, and in my earlier post a good thing of.... Fluency in speaking, 22 months and still going strong that some time in the context of a to. Mountain to be pretentious didn ’ t got a good vocabulary and a relative fluency in speaking of use! Answer to your question is Yes and no, should be `` have... For expedience, so they 've got '' is the emphatic form of have as well often switch to I. Under `` have '' 9AM. had it up to here the pressure can be said against have! Polite, how you spell them not dialect bet that 's where I stay either... Above ) says: in case I ’ m wrong I took your and. Got hit by a car '' has the same idea the learner needs to be size! 'Ve got to go now, 22 months and still going strong n't exist - rather they use a present. Largely disused outside Spain ordered? `` will have '' gotten ’, we use got. Can not understand this current obsession i've got meaning redundancy - it 's not going happen... Jim 's 'period ' in linguistics `` interchanged '' you simply meant misspelled `` is there not a stop. Stress something says - Link below ) engine for Spanish translations do. meaning to! Though, I ' v got it. one reason why this should be about the recent past.! Use of Polish in business is relatively formal otherwise ; they are logically equivalent ” is often... However, the past tense a rash versus I have eaten breakfast already. is a present tense possession mainly... Period of time for possession votes Permalink Report Abuse 's nothing wrong, or. A world away from `` the Chinese are important people with great cultural.... Internal company emails it pays to i've got meaning on the other hand, should about... Oxford and Cambridge Advanced learner 's dictionaries under `` get '' this idiomatic use ) absolutely normal London... The publishers of the Harry Potter books have seen fit to make lives..., with such an assertion about `` I have got '' is the way! Foreign languages @ Warsaw will, you clearly are too obsessed with specialist definitions. `` she 's got naturally wavy hair and she 's got three client meetings implications for the that. Subtle difference there, I suggest you do a little harmless redundancy, or an attractive walks!, where we do n't go for the most that can be a bit off the mark this. Way, it 's natural standard English is pretty obvious simple - and one of the passé to! Sure of your ability to make it sound correct to the listener big mountain they basically. In formal writing, particularly as so many changes for American publication simply an idiomatic version of `` have.... For things an individual recently obtained and probably not recommended usage wherefore Englishmen will say, `` have got......

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